Whitebread on Patrol » Blog Archive » Week-Late Range Report: Guns n Geese

Week-Late Range Report: Guns n Geese

img_0673

Last Monday, with it being my day off, Mrs. Whitebread being on temporary layoff, and temperatures hovering around 68, we figured we’d be insane not to get a range trip in. I was itching to shoot my new AR-15, ordered at 10PM on election night. I had gotten a basic function check at the indoor range in town, but with ranges limited to 25 yards, I wasn’t going to get the extended-range experience that I wanted: shooting the rifle out to 100 yards. Besides, my wife had not yet gotten to shoot it, and with the minor recoil of the .223, I had the feeling she was going to like it.

Following instructions from pdb, I set up my folding table and chairs at 55 yards and erected a benchrest shooting platform.

img_0596

Oh, my! The sights are significantly off at 55 yards:

img_0607

The yellow spots are the sunlight shining through the holes left in the cardboard backer by the generous person before us who left their target stand up. I don’t understand why they do that… a complete target with wooden sticks and cardboard IDPA target backer runs me about $4 total. Usually someone has left theirs up before me, but if not, I always disassemble mine and take them with me.

Here I am, with sunglasses, working on an AR’s front sight. It was a very Sarah Connor moment:

img_0616

I know that you’re supposed to be able to turn the front sight post with the bullet tip you use to depres the detent, but mine was really stiff and would not turn easily. I used the pliars from my multi-tool and got the job done, but marred the front post in the process. Oh well. I didn’t buy the thing to look pretty.

It took almost a full magazine, shooting in groups of five, but I finally got my rounds in a 3″ diameter circle around the X ring. I know that this sucks for shooting a rifle that can hit man-size targets at 300 yards with irons, but I’m a newbie with lots to learn, and it still fills the purpose I had for the rifle, which is minute-of-badguy indoors or inside 100 yards outside. The rails hanging off the handguards are from Command Arms and are for holding the M3 LED light, which lives on the rifle at home, but was taken off for easier benchrest shooting.

Let pictures commence!

img_0650

img_0675

Check out the gas in front of the muzzle and the brass (OK, steel) leaving the ejection port.

img_0686

Check out the brass in midair and the half-closed bolt! Easily my favorite picture from the day:

img_0689

img_0647

We moved a little closer and did some shooting at 7 yards to simulate fighting with the rifle inside the house. MrsWhitebread and I swapped equipment and she gave it a try.

img_0659

It was a beautiful day, so we decided to grab Sonic and eat lunch at the park. I try not to think about how many rules we were breaking with the firearms on our persons and in the trunk.

img_0654

We bought a cheap loaf of bread and fed the ducks.

img_0701

This goose would eat the crust and leave the rest. Weird.

img_0726

Check out the blue eyes on this goose!

img_0723

It was a great day.

5 Responses to “Week-Late Range Report: Guns n Geese”

  1. Mrs. Whitebread says:

    Photo credit for all but the photo of me: me.

    :)

  2. BBB says:

    I was wondering why there was no photo credits going up for Mrs Whitebread! Very professional and striking photos.

    What brand of tactical whitebread do you prefer? ;)

    Now what other methods of shooting are you going to work on from here? Benchrest is good for sighting in, of course… but you are going to be prone, sitting crosslegged, etc… at some point, right?

    Also that rifle is begging for a sling.

    Great writeup, tho!

  3. pdb says:

    You shoot like a journalist! Lean into it!

    :)

  4. Whitebread says:

    I was pushed back by the mighty recoil of the .223!

  5. DirtCrashr says:

    A scratch on the front post can help you to remember to focus on *it* and not the target. Keeping a sharp eye on the front p[ost helps to reduce shot dispersion. I’ve tried a few things like spraying it with sight black and then using a pencil to remove a bit of that – it’s an old and helpful trick!